Posts Tagged ‘Innerstrings Lightshow’

Brighton Beat: Hamilton Yarns live

January 19, 2013

Hamilton Yarns seemed an unlikely choice of guest band at Synthesise Me, but their performance last night was both spellbinding and entirely appropriate. Bathed in the soft glow and turning colours of S.M.s trademark projections- courtesy, as always, of the Innerstrings Psychedelic Lightshow- the Yarns conjured up a womb-dream ambience in their packed corner of the Hotel Pellirocco bar, as insulated from the background chatter at the other end of the room as from the snowbound seafront outside.

Stripped down to their core trio, Hamilton Yarns adapted their usual acoustic, experimental-pastoral, lo-fi kraut-folk to a form more suited to Synthesise Me’s electronic music theme, and went down as well with the regular crowd of open-minded electronica buffs as with the boho girls sat cross-legged on the floor sketching the band as they played. Iain, Joss and Alistair presided over a Bagpuss antique shop of analogue synthesisers and battery-powered organs, plus autoharp, trumpet, bass guitar and Joss’s sparingly-used snare-and-cymbal drum set-up. From this coven emerged lullabies for lost spacemen, hints of early Tangerine Dream style ambience but scaled down to Farmers’ Market level, denuded of pomp and grandiosity to reveal a more satisfying and subtle pathos and poignancy instead.

Strange burbles from the ether suggested 1950s Bakelite wireless sci-fi serials, the village moon project constructed from a shed. And finally, most unlikely of all, the first- to my knowledge- Hamilton Yarns cover version; a minimalist take on Lionel Ritchie’s ‘Hello’, delivered with all the emotionally-repressed passive aggression of a red-faced municipal library pants-fumbler, incapable of eye contact but still in need of a love and affection he just can’t find among his collection of musty matchboxes and dead field mice.

Mention too must be made of Jason Williams’ extraordinary DJ set, incorporating the use of a 1970s spectrum shifter with a supposed pedigree of past owners taking in ELP and dubious pre-Numan punk-synth pioneers Rikki and the Last Days of Earth, as well as a shot glass ingeniously substituting for the centre spindle of an ex jukebox 45. One hopes for more in this vein from all concerned.